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Amazon Web Services (AWS) - Request Limit Exceeded

We are using Amazon Web Services (AWS) hosting our little project Friended.com. Today, we are down for quite some time. I will be able to know how long the outage took place once Friended.com is back online again, thanks to Pingdom monitoring service. As of this time 5:41pm EST AWS Service Health Dashboard (http://status.aws.amazon.com/) status for North Virginia delays or not accessible.
  • Amazon CloudWatch (N.Virginia) - Delays is CloudWatch metrics for RDS, ELB and ElasticCache since 12:03 PM PDT
  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (N.Virginia) - Degraded EBS performance in a single Availability Zone since 10:38 AM PDT, still posting updates ...
  • Amazon ElasticCache (N. Virginia) - ElasticCache Cache Nodes experiencing connectivity issues in a single Availability Zone since 11:39 AM PDT ...
  • Amazon Relational Database Service (N. Virginia) - RDS Database instances are experiencing connectivity issues in a single Availability Zone since 11:03 AM PDT
  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk (N. Virginia) - Elevated API failures and delays in Environment since 11:06 AM PDT.
  • And AWS Management Console - Elevated Error Rates since 12:07 PM PDT.
The time posted here is through Service Health Dashboard, so the outage time might be earlier 10-15 minutes of posting.

Cloud service suppose to give businesses a dependable service, 24x7 accesssibility, scalability and uptime 99.95%. Not at this time. Remember what happened to GoDaddy's hosting service last September 10, 2012 millions of businesses (their websites) are down due to their router data table problem. And last October 19, 2012 that took down portion of its customer emails.

Just remember, Cloud Computing Technology still a machine, a pool of servers that managed by human. Hopefully Friended.com will be back online shortly.

Update: Pingdom Alert: Friended.com is UP again at 10/22/12/ 06:04:30PM, after 4h 19m of downtime.
Source: http://www.king.net/amazon-cloud-request-limit-exceeded/

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